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LNB and LNBF Questions     List of Categories

  1. Do I really need a Hi Stab or HiStab LNB?

  2. What is a LNBF?

  3. I bought a new LNB for C band, now my channels are not on the correct channel number.

  4. What does LNB stand for?

  5. My LNB died during a lightning storm !

  6. What frequency is C Band?

  7. What Frequency is Ku?

  8. What is LO and what are the numbers?




  1. Do I really need a Hi Stab or HiStab LNB?

    Well, it depends. Many years ago when the technology was not as good a high stability LNB was a desired item.

    With today's technology, the normal LNB is as good as the high stab LNBs used to be. One can still buy a HiStab LNB, but for consumer applications of 4DTV, MPEG-2 and analog you really do not need one. You might want to consider a High Stability LNB if your running a radio station downlink, paging or some other mission critical application as well as subject to extreme temperature deviations.

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  2. What is a LNBF?

    This is really a LNB with a built in feed horn and electronic polarizer.

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  3. I bought a new LNB for C band, now my channels are not on the correct channel number.

    You bought a LNB that has a output of 950-1450 MHz and your receiver uses something other than that range for the input. Some of the older receiver used things like 930-1430 MHz as their range. If you put the new LNB on those, your channels won't line up.

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  4. What does LNB stand for?

    LNB stands for Low Noise Blockconverter. It converts a range or "block" of frequencies to another range or "block" of frequencies. Early stuff like we sold in the late 70s or early 80s was a LNA, which stood for Low Noise Amplifier. The downconverter for those was seperate from the LNA.

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  5. My LNB died during a lightning storm !

    That happens from time to time. It usually happens because some part of the system is not grounded in a "proper" fashion. There is a lot more to grounding than just driving a ground rod into the soil and hoping for the best. And you have to suffer a direct hit to have lots of damage to your LNB or receiver. Your satellite system is very prone to to damage due to the way this stuff is installed with the dish located away from the house.

    Having years of experience in this area of telecommunications and radio, I can show you how to minimize the damage from the forces of nature. Click our link  LIGHTNING  for details.

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  6. What frequency is C Band?

    C band is 3.4 to 3.7 GHz

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  7. What Frequency is Ku?

    Ku runs about 10.7 to 13.25 GHz or so. Ku is much higher in frequency than C band and requires a tighter aim of the dish and more critical alignment of the other dish components.

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  8. What is LO and what are the numbers?

    Lo stands for Local Oscillator. C band is 5150 MHz and Ku is 10.750 GHz. A universal Ku LNB will use 10.600 GHz.

    These are the numbers that you will need to enter into your MPEG-2 receiver for it to work.

    The LNB outputs a range of 950-1450 MHz.

    We can figure what frequency your receiver is actually tuned to as follows:

    Take for example NASA TV as it exist today on AMC-9 using a transponder frequency of 3880.

    The C Band LO of 5150 is the starting number and we subtract the transponder frequency of 3880 from it:

    5150 - 3880 = 1270

    So your receiver is actually tuned to 1270 MHz which is within the range of 950-1450 MHz that comes from your LNB.

    Lets try another one.

    KTWO-TV is on satelilte G-10R as it exists today and uses a transponder frequency of 12.108 GHz. The math is a bit different, but simple still.

    12.108 - 10.750 = 1358 MHz

    Again, this is what your receiver is tuned to.

    This math is what makes the LNB so special, it takes the input, whether it is C or Ku Band, and outputs it in a standard range of 950-1450 MHz.

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